For Frozen Yogurt in Myrtle Beach, Sweet Frog is worth the leap!

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For Frozen Yogurt in Myrtle Beach, Sweet Frog is worth the leap!

Fans of Sweet Frog marvel at its array of flavors including Island Banana, Sweet Coconut, Ginger Lemonade, New York Cheesecake, Peanut Butter, Original Tart and Chocolate. All are irresistible flavors of which Sweet Frog fans can’t get enough.

Gina Frazier, a Myrtle Beach resident, frequents the Carolina Forest location. She said she never tires of Sweet Frog.

“Sweet Frog is so good, Frazier said. “The yogurt is healthy for you, the place is clean and the environment is nice. Plus, the staff is friendly.”

Most of the yogurts are gluten free, while others are fat-fat, allergens and sugar-free. There are about 50 toppings, including fresh fruit, brownies, and marshmallow.

Frazier said the heavenly-tasting yogurt is pure pleasure at its best. 

“You have the fresh fruit: blueberries, strawberries, kiwi & oh my goodness, my mouth is watering,” Frazier said. Sweet Frog is the bomb. The other yogurt shops need to close down because Sweet Frog is the best.”

The self-serve yogurt parlor has small, medium and large cups. Customers can get a Sweet Frog card, which employees punch with each yogurt purchase. Once a customer buys 10 yogurts, he or she gets a 12-ounce yogurt free. The yogurt is priced per ounce, with prices varying. Some stores may charge 39.9 cents, while others charge slightly more.

Founded in 2009 by Derek Cha, the yogurt chain made its Grand Strand debut when a franchise store opened in Carolina Forest in 2011.The yogurt parlor, colored in bright hues of deep sherbet and bubblegum pink, is designed to keep or get folks in good spirits.

An adorable green frog character, gripping a pink spoon, adorns signage and T-shirts. Although the frog looks similar to the Sanrio frog known as Keroppi, this frog has a distinctive meaning to its name that reflects the faith of billions. The acronym for this amphibian mascot stands for Fully Rely On God. Folks can buy T-shirts with John 3:16 printed on them, as Christian music plays softly in the background.<br />

The Christian company's character reflects the faith of its founder, Cha, a native of South Korea, who came to the United States when he was 12, according the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Cha became an entrepreneur in 1986 when he launched a frame store near Washington. It grew and eventually he had a national chain, Art Frame, which had more than 80 locations. In 2006, the chain began faltering and eventually Cha was left with one store in Dallas.

Later, in 2009, he and his wife, Annah Kim, started Sweet Frog when the economy was in its dire downturn. He believed, however, his faith and his plan to operate Sweet Frog would endure the financial storm. And it did.

By the end of 2012, Cha said he anticipates having about 200 Sweet Frog locations in 20 states. By 2020, he hopes to have 1,000 frozen yogurt parlors in the United States and 1,000 international spots.

If the growth of local ownership is any proof of Cha's dream, then he seems to be well on his way to achieving those goals.

The Grand Strand, for example, now has four Sweet Frog locations &ndash; three of which are owned by Randy Webb, who was responsible for bringing Sweet Frog to the area. Since Webb opened his first store in Carolina Forest, he has since launched Sweet Frog in Surfside Beach and a seasonal location on Ocean Boulevard in Myrtle Beach's three locations in less than a year. In addition, Webb is also going to start a location in Columbia.

Mark Skinner, the owner of the Sweet Frog location at Surfwood Plaza, is going to launch a Sweet Frog spot in Florence. Like Webb, he, too, opened his first location in the fall of 2011.

At Sweet Frog, we represent family values,” said Webb, who is an ordained minister. People can come to Sweet Frog and have fun and have a choice of what they want. They can create their own dessert in a happy place.

If you go:

What: Sweet Frog
Where: 3669 Renee Drive, Myrtle Beach, S.C.; 2711 Beaver Run Blvd., Surfside Beach, S.C.; and 254 U.S. 17 N., North Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Hours: Times vary
Information: (843) 796-2199 (Carolina Forest/Myrtle Beach); (843)-748-0537 (Surfside Beach); (843) 663-3456 (North Myrtle Beach)