Best Fishing Holes in Myrtle Beach

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Best Fishing Holes in Myrtle Beach

Having the Atlantic Ocean in your backyard is one heck of a honey hole, but you still have to know where to go to land the big ones. The Grand Strand is lined with great places to wet the line and land a whopper.

Whether you cast from a boat, a pier, the beach or some of the Strand’s inland waters, there are a variety of species out there ready to bite. Here are some hot spots to hook dinner or a wall-hanger:

Boat

Boat

There’s no surer way to catch fish than to go where they live. That means boarding one of the many charter fishing boats that sail out of the Grand Strand. Short trips just a mile or two off the coast or all-day trips to the Gulf Stream are available, and passengers get to keep what they catch. Check out Captain Dick’s out of Murrells Inlet or the Little River Fishing Fleet on the North Strand. If you’re more the catch-and-release type, they also offer dolphin-watching tours.

Piers

Piers

This is your best chance to land a big one without boarding a boat. Some fishing pier, such as Second Avenue Pier and Apache Pier, stretch nearly 1,000 feet out over the ocean, allowing anglers better access to the larger fish that lurk beyond the breakers. The adjoining bait shops have you covered on licenses, tackle, bait and info about what’s running. Catch bass, drum, flounder, bluefish, and king and Spanish mackerel and many more, depending on the time of year.

Surf

Surf

You’ve seen some of these poor guys with their poles perched in the sand and not so much as a nibble to show for it. You might get lucky casting off the beach at some random location, but there are better places to surf fish with success. For instance, the jetty on the north end of Huntington Beach State Park and along the inlets where fish come in to feed at high tide are ideal locations for catching a keeper so close to the coast.

Inland

Inland

For those who prefer freshwater fishing, there are plenty of honey holes waiting west of the Atlantic. Natural bays that are prevalent along the Carolina coast are home to bass, bream, crappie and other species. Try the Intracoastal Waterway, Waccamaw River or the Black River down around Georgetown, and check with many of the local bait shops for gear and inside info.